Social Network Image And Video Size Guide

Social Network Image And Video Size Guide

Here is an infographic that you can use to find out what the latest social network image and video sizes are. What is the maximum file size and resolution for a 16:9 video in YouTube? What is the maximum width of animated GIFs when used on Tumblr? All these answers and more are contained in this new infographic from Spredfast.

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How To Use GooglePlus Ripples To Boost Engagement

GooglePlus Ripple diagrams allow you to see who is sharing and resharing your posts. This lets you discover influencers and track how their connections react to your content. I spend a lot of my daily social media time in Google+. Using the ripples feature is just one of those tools…

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SOCIAL MEDIA JAIL – So What Did You Promise?

Did you over promise on what the results would be from your social media activities and campaigns? Are you trying to gain leads and insights with your social media efforts? Are you looking beyond just the basics of clicks and likes? No? Remember that in social media jail the motto is “there is always room for one more”.

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Museums And Social Media

Why haven’t museums embraced more of a multimedia approach to social media?

museums and social media


Museums And Social Media 

Museums sometimes seem to have a split identity — some institutions are on the bleeding edge of innovation, taking full advantage of the internet and technology in spreading access to their collections and programming. Others are stuck in the past, operating just how they might have decades ago with administrations unwilling to push technological initiatives. A report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project on “Arts Organizations and Digital Technologies” provides a fascinating insight into just how museums and other cultural institutions view their relationship to the web.

The study collected data from 1,258 arts organizations, which were drawn from a list of 5,773 National Endowment for the Arts grantees. 84% of the organizations are nonprofits, and 13% focus principally on the visual arts, while others take on music, theater, literature, and design, among other disciplines.

Below, we collected some points we learned from the report about how these institutions employ technology and the internet in the hope of expanding their audiences, aiding staff, and augmenting programming.

How Much Social Media Is Enough?

Pew’s group of responders all had social media presences, but it’s interesting to see just how energy is put into social networks:

99% of those surveyed use Facebook (compared to 17% on Google+),
74% use Twitter, and
67% use YouTube (compared to 23% on Vimeo),
38% use Flickr (compared to only 7% on Instagram),
31% use LinkedIn,
20% use Foursquare,
but only 13% are active on Tumblr.
Most museums use between 2 and 6 social networks and post “several times a week.”

Facebook and Twitter are useful in conveying information to fans, but they’re not so great for multimedia experiences. The multimedia-friendly social networks actually seem to get less play for museums. A tight majority of 56% of respondents believe that social media has a major impact on “boosting your organization’s public profile,” so maybe it’s not so unbelievable that some institutions are sluggish on social media.

From Hyperallergic – why haven’t museums embraced more of a multimedia approach to social media?